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412, 2020

CCPA Blog Series: Post No. 4 We Barely Got to Know You: How Prop 24 Changed the CCPA

December 4th, 2020|Categories: Litigation Articles|

In our first three posts on the CCPA, we discussed how its data privacy provisions might affect businesses and empower consumers, as well as the law’s implications on COVID-19 temperature checks. Although it has been a mere eleven months since the CCPA took effect, we already have a new law Continue Reading

January 2021

Monthly Litigation Law Tip

The California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) has applied to many California businesses since January 2020, and it already faces change with the recent passage of the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”). The CPRA has a few immediate effects, like extending the duration of employer-employee exceptions, but there are many other changes that business must prepare for by January 1, 2023. Businesses should plan to update their CCPA policies accordingly.

607, 2020

Buckles, Clasps, and Other New Tools for Trademark Enforcement

July 6th, 2020|Categories: Litigation Articles|

Business that use trademarks or service marks now have a more powerful remedy against others who use those marks, or confusingly similar ones, without consent. A new United States Supreme Court decision, issued April 23, 2020, removes the requirement of proving willful infringement to recover lost profits. Plaintiffs in trademark Continue Reading

105, 2020

Kim v. Reins: Another PAGA Wrench Thrown Into the Settlement Finish Line for Employers

May 1st, 2020|Categories: Litigation Articles|

On March 12, 2020, the California Supreme Court issued its highly anticipated decision in Kim v. Reins. The Court held that an employee does not lose standing to pursue a claim under the Private Attorneys General Act of 2004 (PAGA) if the employee settles and dismisses his or her individual Continue Reading

1202, 2020

Show Me the Money! –Ninth Circuit Clarifies CAFA Standards

February 12th, 2020|Categories: Litigation Articles|Tags: , , , , , , |

In Arias v. Residence Inn by Marriott, the Ninth Circuit clarified and reiterated standards related to the removal of an action to federal court under the Class Action Fairness Act (“CAFA”) — namely, what a defendant must show to meet the CAFA amount in controversy requirement and how a district Continue Reading